A micro camera in place of the eye

A micro camera in place of the eye

Rob Spence, 36 years old, canadian director. At 9 years old, an accident with his grandfather’s gun deprived him of an eye. Many interventions not gone well. Watching American TV series, a few years ago, he has the idea of a bionic eye. So he contacted a California company specialized in miniature cameras for portable devices that provided him with a tiny camera, just 3.2 square millimeters with a resolution of 328x 250 pixels adapted to his eye.

Today he has a micro camera in the eyeball. The camera hasn’t really replaced the natural eye: it isn’t connected to the brain, but for his work as documentary filmmaker is a great help, he transmits wireless to any portable device whatever its “eye” sees.

In reality, Rob has different eyes, more than one. A white one that acts as a prosthesis that he leads under the bandage, two with a camera inside and one hyper-realistic. The decision of Spencer, also known as “eyeborg man”, has aroused different reactions. Who says it’s just a publicity stunt, who accused him of breach of privacy.

Of course the use of a miniature camera in every context can bring great benefits in terms of security and surveillance and, for documentary purposes, it knows no comparisons. Always smaller in size, the best companies are able to hide them everywhere: ties, pens, sunglasses, key rings and all sorts of objects. In many cases the only solution to situations that would otherwise not be verified and offer resolutions worthy of the film industry.

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